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A lot of people would like Safari to show favicons in the tab bar, just like Chrome does. And it’s been the subject on various blog posts, and podcasts. But it was a post by John Gruber, that got Timing developer Daniel Alm interested.

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He then went on and made an app called Faviconographer, that doesn’t exactly add that feature to Safari, but instead analyses Safari and the current tabs, and overlays the relevant favicon where it should be.

It’s not perfect, but it does make Safari much better. I just can’t believe it’s still not an official feature.

You can download Faviconographer, and also read more about how it works, the current limitations, and also some other information on the app on the Faviconographer website.

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I’ve been wanting (not exactly looking for) a better way to quickly deal with screenshots on macOS for a while, and while looking over Product Hunt today, there was an app called ShotBox climbing the ranks.

It was free, and it looked interesting, so I gave it a shot. I was very pleased with what I found, and it’s such a simple utility, but it’s exactly what I need.

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It’s similar to the new screenshot feature in iOS, in that when it detects a new screenshot, it opens up a small window in the bottom-left corner, so you can quickly edit and share.

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There are actually only two things you can do in that window, and they are preview and edit. And of course when you close the window, you get the option to quickly delete the screenshot, or to save it.

I initially didn’t think it would work properly on my Mac, as I have Hazel move my screenshots into a separate folder, which I then have rules on archiving. So therefore they don’t just sit on my desktop. However, ShotBox lets you select a folder to watch, so this wasn’t an issue!

You can find out more information on ShotBox, and also download it for free using these links:

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Brad Moon, writing for Forbes:

With Apple’s September iPhone event --and the official release of its latest operating systems-- just days away, Apple continues pushing out public betas of iOS 11. A lot of people are downloading this software and loading it on their iPhones. But why?

When you install the iOS 11 public beta, you are essentially testing the software for Apple. Using your own hardware, apps and data. For free.

You don’t even get a tee shirt. Apple spikes this point out on the website for its Beta Software Program: “This program is voluntary, and there is no compensation for your participation.”

Because getting early access to upcoming software can only be a bad thing?

Heck, even by the time the company puts out the official annual iOS release in September, there are usually significant bugs still remaining. That’s why I wait for the first revision to be released before installing it on my devices.

It simply sounds like he’s had a bad experience, and that should apparently affect you too.

He goes on to point out a few sections of the beta agreement, which he has to expand on further that they “even use all caps”. The agreement states that the devices may not be able to be restored after using beta software, Apple will not be liable to any problems with using the software, and general stuff that you’d expect.

It’s not a final piece of software, and like all their public betas (which come after the more buggy developer betas), they are to be used at your own risk. And completely optional!

I just don’t see the issue. But I think his trust issues go further than the stability of the actual software:

If you have a spare iPhone or iPad lying around and you're curious about the direction Apple is going, that's also fair game, although not risk-free (and you're still working for free for a company that made a profit in excess of $45 billion in 2016).

Contributing to beta testing, to help make the software and overall experience better can only be a bad thing. Especially when you don’t even get a t-shirt.

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iA Writer 5 is scheduled to be released at the end of September, and there’s one feature that they’ve already announced, and I love it.

It’s a configurable keyboard!

Above the iOS keyboard on an iPhone, you usually get the little keyboard row where apps can add shortcuts to functionality, and also for basic things like undo and redo. But iA have gone a step further, and not only added some cool features like the ability to search through actions, files, and text in a document, but a customisable keyboard that opens up when you tap the ⌘ key.

You get the standard markdown syntax for things like headers, links, footnotes, lists, etc. But also the ability to swap and rearrange them.

You can see for yourself some of the available keys in their video, but I imagine there will be a load more when it’s released.

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If you’re a programmer, you’re probably aware about version control and Git, and maybe even what a .gitignore file is.

If you don’t:

A gitignore file specifies intentionally untracked files that Git should ignore. Files already tracked by Git are not affected; see the NOTES below for details.

Anyway, creating these files can be annoying to write manually, and there a bunch of templates all over the internet to make this much easier.

I however, found a much better solution for creating these files, and it’s gitignore.io. It’s a website that you can use to generate a .gitignore file, but also a command line tool that you can use, so you never have to leave your terminal.

It has support for operating systems, IDEs, and programming languages. So my standard file will be generated from macOS, Xcode, and Swift, since that’s how I roll.

You can type (with autofill of course) whatever templates you want to make use of straight into the website, and then hit ‘Create’.

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For the command line, you’ll have to first install it, and then the gi command will be available. All you need to do is type gi followed by a comma-separated list of the same items you would use on the website.

So mine would be:

gi macos,xcode,swift.

The command would of course, output this out via the standard output, so you can direct it straight into your .gitignore file by writing something like:

gi macos,xcode,swift >> .gitignore

It’s super easy, and it saves a lot of time.

As a little bonus, there’s also a quick video on how to install and use the command line tool.

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Jonas Gessner, developer of ProTube:

I am very sad to announce that ProTube was removed from the App Store by Apple on September 1, 2017. This comes after multiple requests and threats by YouTube which ultimately led Apple to suddenly pulling the app from the App Store. ProTube and many other 3rd party YouTube apps on the App Store have been targeted by YouTube with takedown requests.

YouTube first requested Apple to remove my app well over a year ago, initially just stating that my app violates their Terms of Service. This was a generic takedown request they sent to many YouTube apps at once. They later started going into more detail, even stating that I could not sell the app as that alone violates their ToS. They basically wanted me to remove every feature that made ProTube what it is – that includes the player itself that allows you to play 60fps videos, background playback, audio only mode and more. Without those features ProTube would not be any better than YouTube's own app, and that is exactly what they want to achieve. YouTube wants to sell its $10/month subscription service which offers many features that ProTube also offered for a lower one time price, so they started hunting down 3rd party YouTube apps on the App Store.

This is very sad news. ProTube is far better than the official YouTube app in nearly everyway, and now YouTube have finally got their way and forced it from the App Store.

My favourite parts of ProTube was the option to get an audio only version of a video, support for iOS Picture-in-Picture, and background playback, just to name a few.

I'm going to keep the app installed on my iPhone and iPad, but I'm not sure what (if anything) will happen to them because of the removal. Whatever happens to them though, there won't be anymore updates, and when YouTube make changes to the API, the app will sadly stop working.

I doubt there's any point in finding an alternative, as no doubt if anything is as close to the quality of ProTube, it will be shut down in the same manner.

Read the full statement

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It’s now almost midway through my holiday in Tenerife, and I’ve been noticing a few ways I’ve been using Twitter differently, seeing as I’m not constantly being updated.

As most people would expect, I haven’t been constantly stuck to my phone (with the exception of music and podcasts), so I haven’t been able to be 100% caught up with my timeline. Whereas I’m usually a maximum of 1 hour behind, given that I’m awake. I’m not sure if that’s a good thing or not, or whether it’s good for productivity, but that’s what happens.

But instead of my usual Twitter activity, I’m hardly posting anything, but I still want to keep an eye on anything significant that’s going on.

I actually have three Twitter clients installed on my phone at the minute, and they’ve each gained a temporary place in my daily usage. My client of choice was previously Tweetbot, but I was getting bored recently, and was checking out the current state of Twitterrific, so that’s the reasons for the first two. The last one is the official Twitter app, and that’s purely for keeping up with what updates are being added, and also so I can see a poll if I need to.

So seeing as I just want to see the most essential/interesting content from the day, my Twitter usage normally consists of:

  • Checking the official Twitter app for the “What you’ve missed” section (I’ve 99% got the actual name wrong, but you get the idea). I may read some related tweets, but I feel this gets me updated.
  • I use Tweetbot every now and then for push notifications, and also to check out the Activity section. Which shows follows, likes, and mentions, all in the same list, so that’s how I make sure I’m up to date on anyone interacting with me.
  • Any “normal” use of Twitter where I want to search for someone, specifically see a users timeline, or just checkout the most recent tweets (not particularly often, but when I’m bored), I do all of this in Twitterrific.

Looking back on my usage, it seems pretty standard. Apart from the use of three different apps of course. I’m going to try and force myself to use Twitterrific a bit more, and then make a decision on that, so then it’s only the two.

The biggest plus for me for the last few days has been the official Twitter app, because it’s pretty quick to read the curated list of tweets that apparently I’ve missed out on. I’ve found to be a pretty well curated list, and unless there’s some big thing that I just haven’t seen, I feel as up to date as usual.

Maybe this will prompt a change in how I use Twitter when I get home, but I’m not putting any importance into that idea.

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I will be off on holiday tomorrow (Thursday) for two weeks in Tenerife!

Therefore, there will be no content (I'm 99.999% sure of this) posted here, unless I'm super bored and need something to do 🤓.

As always, I'll be posting far too many photos on my Instagram, and probably more boring content on Twitter.

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There's a lot of occasions where I'm checking the specific iOS icon sizes, and I remember I made a document a few years ago with some references. However, there's been a huge amount of changes since then. So I decided to create a new reference document from the Xcode 9.0 beta.

It's hosted as a Gist on Github, or you can view it below:

I'm going to make an effort to keep this updated, and I'll probably create one for the other platforms as well. Anyway, I hope people find this useful!

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(This video is from last year, but everything in it is as true as it always has been).

Manuel ‘Manny’ Lopez and Daryl Dominguez aren’t just good mates, they’re two of the gnarliest skaters coming up in London. Always looking for a new challenge, we captured their night-long skate through the heart of The City.

In the first episode of our Own the Night series, created with Samsung, VICE Sports joins Manny and Daryl as they talk flow, creativity and skating – in a deserted, nocturnal London.

I spent a lot of my time growing up, skateboarding in London. And I can say I agree with everything said in this video. Skateboarding is more than a sport, or a basic hobby, it enables you to think differently about nearly everything in the world, and it's such a creative thing to do.

I've noticed a lot of similar traits in skateboarders, whether it's the determination to get that trick, get back up after you've injured yourself, or to just think about stupidly innovative ideas, and turn boring city structures into super interesting and complex playgrounds. There's also the added benefit of a broader perspective on things, as skateboarding usually takes you all around the world (including some locations that may or not be locked, closed off to public, or just in the middle of nowehere), and therefore you get to meet so many people from all sorts of backgrounds.

Plus, London at night is pretty cool all by itself.