29th December 2017

So, Apple finally came clean with the battery stuff on older iPhones:

We’ve been hearing feedback from our customers about the way we handle performance for iPhones with older batteries and how we have communicated that process. We know that some of you feel Apple has let you down. We apologize. There’s been a lot of misunderstanding about this issue, so we would like to clarify and let you know about some changes we’re making.

First and foremost, we have never — and would never — do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product, or degrade the user experience to drive customer upgrades. Our goal has always been to create products that our customers love, and making iPhones last as long as possible is an important part of that.

The situation isn’t ideal, in that they’ve annoyed, and probably confused some of their customers by not making it transparent from the start.

However, the actual power management feature that people are complaining about, actually seems like a really good idea.

About a year ago in iOS 10.2.1, we delivered a software update that improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, and iPhone SE. With the update, iOS dynamically manages the maximum performance of some system components when needed to prevent a shutdown. While these changes may go unnoticed, in some cases users may experience longer launch times for apps and other reductions in performance.

I’ve seen a lot of news outlets saying that this is Apple trying to move people to newer iPhones, and even that it is causing iPhones to not last as long (Not the battery, but the actual device’s lifespan).

I can only see this update doing the exact opposite. It slowed down performance, but that is to extend the short term battery life, and also the long term life of the device.

The lack of communication is what messes everything up though. Even if you disregard the trust factor of Apple doing this without telling anybody, it leads users to believe that they are affected by it, when in some cases they might not be. So after seeing a small bit of news about Apple slowing down iPhones, someone with a completely unrelated device, or even an affected device with another issue, would more than likely blame this new power management update.

What Apple are doing about this, is actually quite impressive. They’re reducing the price of an out of warranty battery replacement by $50. But more importantly, they’re going to start making the battery heath more visible in iOS. It’s something you have on a Mac, and I will welcome it to iOS.

They could have avoided this whole situation though, as clearly they proved they can be transparent about this feature (although in this case it was forced). So why didn’t they write a small article about a “new power management feature” and how they’re extending the lifespans of older devices, and then just make the whole thing optional.

14th July 2017
Permalink

Gordon Kelly, writing for Forbes:

The consistently reliable site reports further iPhone 8 problems exist with the integration of Touch ID into the display, the supply of OLED for the display itself and operation of the new front facing “3D sensor” camera – which will bring unlocking via facial recognition.

In fact these problems are reported to be so severe that several of the functions will not be available when the phone launches, forcing Apple to enable them later via a software update…

“By all accounts, it’s late in the game for Apple to be wrestling with problems as big as those described above,” concludes Fast Company and that’s certainly true. With mass manufacturing usually starting three months prior to release (and a September unveiling locked in stone) solutions are needed, and quickly.

I’m not sure if they just needed to get an article out about the future iPhone 8, but in my opinion it’s a load of rubbish.

Sure, Gruber also said that the charging feature may be sold separately, or just released with a later version of iOS. But it’s not a real problem, that warrants writing about a “serious problem”. The device isn’t even announced yet, let along being released.

I’m really not a fan of rumour posts, and normally I’d just ignore it, but this if Forbes! I would of thought they’d had better things to write about.

06th July 2017

I had my third experience triggering Emergency SOS on my Apple Watch this morning, but this one was the most annoying.

If you haven’t heard of it, then iMore has a good guide on what it is and how to set it up. But basically, it’s something that when triggered, will start beeping loudly while it counts down from 10, and when finished it will call your local emergency services, and share your location with a rather urgent message to your emergency contacts.

To be honest, it sounds really useful. Not something that would get used 99.9% of the time, but it’s nice to know it’s there if you need it. However the action to trigger it, is by holding down the buttons on your watch. Which I believe, is a terrible idea.

As I mentioned before, I’ve accidentally triggered this a few times. I was pretty sure that I saw somewhere that the latest betas had an issue with cancelling it, I’m not sure if this is still true, but nothing I did stopped everything from happening. So my watch beeped loudly on the train for 10 seconds, the (not so equal to 911) emergency services were dialled, and my location was shared with a few people. All because I was leaning on my wrist in a weird way when trying to get off the train.

It’s a nice feature, and is vital to someone in an emergency. But it should be harder to trigger.

24th February 2017

Joe Rossignol, writing for MacRumors:

iPhones that have undergone any third-party screen repair now qualify for warranty coverage, as long as the issue being fixed does not relate to the display itself, according to an internal memo distributed by Apple today. MacRumors confirmed the memo’s authenticity with multiple sources.

Finally, this should of been the case since the start.

Read the full article on MacRumors

19th September 2016

Rene Ritchie along with Serenity Caldwell, has put together a quick video review of the new iPhone 7 and 7 Plus.

When Serenity Caldwell and I took a look at how we wanted to shoot our iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus review video, we new we couldn’t just spout the specs in a room or street set. We had to take to the streets. So, we took the iPhones 7 out and shot with the new wide angle and telephoto cameras, tested the new water resistance, abused the better battery efficiency, tried out the new Home button, and otherwise put them both through their paces and then some — on the streets of New York City!

I don’t really ever get around to reading long reviews, so this video was perfect.

If there’s one iPhone review you’re going to watch, make sure it’s this one. Either watch it below, or follow this link to YouTube.

12th August 2016

Just so I can have it "in writing" if they turn out to be correct.

As I mentioned on Twitter, the dates for the next iPhone (probably iPhone 7):

  • Announcement: 7th September
  • Pre-Order: 9th September
  • Launch: 16th September
  • Launch: 16th/23rd September (Updated: 20th August)

02nd July 2016

9To5Mac have shared a few 3D renders of what a potential iPhone 7 would look like in Space Black. This comes after the previous rumours about a Deep Blue colour being added, but the same source has since reported that it was mistaken for a darker grey/black option.

The renders show an iPhone 7 in a dark, Space Black colour option. The antenna lines have also been redesigned in the renders, as has been rumoured will happen, while the camera module is also larger.

I absolutely love the idea of having at least a near-black iPhone again, Space Grey just isn’t dark enough for me. It also adds more reason for a dark theme in iOS!

I also wish that this Space Black colour (if it would be called that), be added to their range of MacBooks, as I’m a strong admirer of the BlackBook.

The renders were done by Martin Hajek, and you can find loads more on his blog.