14th January 2018

Big Cats is a new documentary series, being produced by the BBC. They have an incredible track record with documentaries, especially ones focussed on nature. As proved by the recent Planet Earth II and Blue Planet II series.

This series follows in the same footsteps, as it is being pushed by a new generation of advanced camera technology, and techniques. Which enables them to get some pretty impressive shots of evasive cat species, such as the Snow Leopard, and the Rusty Spotted-Cat.

The first episode is already out, and it’s great! The scenes were impressive, the amount of knowledge about the different species was incredible, and it was just generally intriguing.

It’s the first time I’ve also heard about the Rusty Spotted-Cat, which is the smallest cat species, and grows to between 35 to 48 cm in length, and a 15 to 30 cm tail. They released a small clip from the first episode, so you can watch that below, or on YouTube.

I’m not sure how they can really make the next episode better than the first, but I expect it will go beyond my expectations. Although it is only a three-episode series, so I guess it will also be pretty packed!

BBC – Big Cats

BBC iPlayer – Big Cats – Episode 1

BBC iPlayer – Episode 1 Clip – The world’s smallest cat

 

02nd November 2016

National Geographic have just released a documentary called "Before the Flood", in which Leonardo DiCaprio explores the world in regards to the effect of climate change, and what we can do to prevent even more harm to our planet.

Before the Flood, directed by Fisher Stevens, captures a three-year personal journey alongside Academy Award-winning actor and U.N. Messenger of Peace Leonardo DiCaprio as he interviews individuals from every facet of society in both developing and developed nations who provide unique, impassioned and pragmatic views on what must be done today and in the future to prevent catastrophic disruption of life on our planet.

It’s an incredible film, and while I was aware of most of climate change, it still opened my eyes up to a lot more harm we are doing. There’s also some people that are actively trying to turn it around, but they alone won’t be able to fix the planet, everyone needs to make themselves aware. Then the process of fixing things, won’t be as difficult.

You can watch the video on YouTube, or below if the embed works on your device. And after that, you can watch more videos on the National Geographic YouTube channel, and everything else they do on their website.

Also, Leo’s speech at the end! Wow.

15th July 2016

I watch TED videos a lot, but I thought this one definitely had to be shared.

Forests don’t have to be far-flung nature reserves, isolated from human life. Instead, we can grow them right where we are — even in cities. Eco-entrepreneur and TED Fellow Shubhendu Sharma grows ultra-dense, biodiverse mini-forests of native species in urban areas by engineering soil, microbes and biomass to kickstart natural growth processes. Follow along as he describes how to grow a 100-year-old forest in just 10 years, and learn how you can get in on this tiny jungle party.

It’s just under 10 minutes, but I found it very fascinating, and it proves there are things we can do to kickstart nature.