Programming


ON: BY: Christopher Hannah

I made my first API today, and I used Swift to do it!

Basically, I got bored this afternoon and decided to have a little research into server-side Swift programming. I’ve heard about this before, but I’ve not gone too deep into it myself.

The problem with me tying things like this, is that I ever really have a good idea, or scenario which I could use to learn the new thing. Well as you may already know, I’m slowly working on a title casing application for iOS and macOS, and therefore I’ve already created a few functions to format text.

So far the base TextCase functions are:

  • Uppercase
  • Lowercase
  • Title Case
  • URL Encoding
  • Mocking SpongeBob (yes, like the meme)

From these formats, the only ones I could see being useful are Title casing, and the fun SpongeBob format.

From making use of various APIs myself, I knew that all I needed was a super simple HTTP server, which had support for a few GET requests.

Perfect was the tool I used to write the server side code, and I found a quick tutorial which explained the basic HTTP server that I needed. I must say it was really easy for me to create this, as I’m already familiar with Swift, so the only thing to learn was the “Perfect” way of doing things.

Because it was in Swift, I could also reuse my main TextCase class which handles the formatting. There was a slight exception, where the arc4random_uniform function isn’t available on Linux, but I found a Linux suitable replacement for this.

There are also a few more reasons why I wanted to try this out, but they’re rather meta. For example, I’m a big fan of Swift, and it feels good working with “low-level” Swift if you can really call it that, and also because I just love the look of Swift in the default Xcode theme, with the SF Mono font 😍 (weird, I know, but it’s the truth).

The final code (as in what I’ve done so far), is three endpoints, which are actually just two. /title/{input text} is to return the given text in title casing, /spongebob/{input text} is for the SpongeBob case. The third one is just /{input text}, and it returns the text in every format available, which is just the two I mentioned so far. The results are in plain JSON, and also include the plain value that was sent in the request.

For example, here is an example response to the / endpoint:

{
    "plain" : "what the hell is this",
    "title" : "What the Hell Is This",
    "spongebob" : "wHAT ThE Hell iS thiS"
}

Anyway, you can view the project over at GitHub, and if you want to suggest any new formats (or even write some yourself), just let me know on Twitter at @chrishannah

ON: BY: Christopher Hannah

It’s been a while since I actually wrote something, and that’s mainly because of my university work that’s been piling up (I finish this June!), and also because I’ve been developing a few mini projects with Swift. The latter is what I’m going to be writing about today.

Basically, over the past few weeks I’ve been getting back into using the command line more. Why is a hard question, but mainly because I’m a nerd, and it’s pretty fun!

It started when I kept seeing a trend of more of the people I follow on Twitter, either retweet or post GIFs of command line apps. It also led me to Hyper, which is a terminal application, and it’s actually built using JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. You can also customise it a ton, especially with the massive amount of themes available.

I personally, have Hyper set up with the hyper-ayu theme, and my favourite monospaced font, SF Mono.

This is getting a bit too meta, so I’ll bring it back on topic.

So I’ve actually developed four command line applications in the past two weeks, and they’ve all been build using Xcode/Swift1. The apps themselves are unix executable files, that can just be double-clicked and ran, but on each project I include more helpful installation/usage information.

cwiki

(Not to be mistaken with my macOS app, Qwiki)

This is the first one I made, and it was probably the easiest of them all. That’s because the majority of the code I could just reuse from my already released app, Qwiki! This app, cwiki , is just a super minimal version of that app.

You just type cwiki followed by a search query, and it will print out the most relevant matches. It does however, only print out a basic description of the articles.

Check out cwiki on GitHub.

So after the first project, I was a bit more intrigued, I decided to make a more interactive app. slink is purely a URL shortener that uses the Goo.gl API, but this lets you shorten, and also expand (Goo.gl) shortened links.

The slightly more complex functionality than before, led me to work out how options are managed in command line apps. So if you want to shorten or expand a link, just use either -s, --shorten, -e, or --expand. I also made a mini usage guide, that you can print out using -h or --help 🤓.

Check out slink on GitHub.

 hacker

The third project was a bit similar to the first two, in that it made use of a few different options to return different data, but it also presented it like cwiki.

It’s a basic interface for Hacker News, and by making use of the various options, you can retrieve the new, top, and best lists.

Check out hacker on GitHub.

TitleCase

Okay this one is really simple, it makes use of Brett Terpstra’s TitleCase API, which formats a given string of text to the AP Title Case style. I actually find these types of tools perfect when writing a blog post, as usually the title is formatted incorrectly.

The API was probably the easiest one I’ve ever used. But then again, there was only one parameter, no options, and one return type.

Check out TitleCase on GitHub.


Now I guess everyone knows what I’ve been up to, so I can get back to slaving away over university work, and making some random projects!

P.S. I actually have some other really great news that I’m going to share here soon, but I’m just waiting on it being finalised a bit more.

  1. My favourite programming language 😍.