02nd August 2018

Neil deGrasse Tyson talks with Brian Tong about his new series Cosmos: Possible Worlds and settles the world’s greatest debates! iPhone or Android? Kirk or Picard? Millennium Falcon or Enterprise? BB-8 or R2-D2?

A few things about Neil deGrasse Tyson you probably didn’t know before.

01st February 2018
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From the Pokémon Company:

Don’t miss the epic new Pokémon GO trailer created in the style of a nature documentary, featuring Pokémon that have recently begun appearing near you in Pokémon GO.

[…]

The video is narrated by iconic actor and comedian Stephen Fry, with his dulcet tones complemented by an original symphonic score by legendary composer George Fenton.

This could quite possibly be one of the best game trailers ever.

Watch on YouTube.

Read the full announcement.

15th January 2018
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Stephen Hackett, writing in his MacStories column:

Today, all of our notebooks are thin and light. We’ve traded our optical drives in for a series dongles and our spinning hard drives for fast, silent SSDs.

It wasn’t always like this. Once upon a time, notebooks had optical drives and a full array of ports, complemented by features like removable batteries.

A decade ago, we entered the current era of notebook design when Steve Jobs pulled the future out of an envelope.

The MacBook Air was a real astonishing product when it first launched, and the envelope presentation shocked quite a lot of people.

Stephen, goes into a lot of detail in his article, where he discusses things like the overall design, the IO it had, and also some of the issues it had.

Along with the article, he also produced another of his insightful videos:

Watch it on YouTube.

Read the full article on MacStories.

28th December 2017
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Jesse Watson has just published a time-lapse he shot of the recent SpaceX launch. You know, the one that looked really strange, and not like any rocket we’ve seen before. However the video is of course over a much longer period of time, and shows a wider angle of everything that went on.

He filmed it from Yuma Arizona, roughly 400 miles away from the launch site. And it took quite a bit of planning:

I scouted four locations that had foregrounds to add depth to the imagery and was uniquely inspiring to my hometown. Location choices were between a favorite local hiking mountain, the Imperial Sand Dunes, or a small hill that resides in the historic downtown area overlooking the city. I ended up choosing the location that overlooked the city, partially because it was the easiest to access with all of my time-lapse gear. I used The Photographer’s Ephemeris and Google Maps to help scouting and initial line up.

I have never shot a rocket launch before, so I did not know exactly what to expect as far as exposure or precise location of the rocket in the horizon. I wanted to be prepared to capture comprehensive coverage of the spectacle. Therefore I packed four cameras and five lenses, to cover wide to telephoto details of the scene. Three of the cameras were rolling time-lapse and 1 was setup for telephoto video.

It’s certainly an interesting story, and also a fantastic video.

Watch below in the embedded player, or if that fails, it’s on Vimeo along with his story.

SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Launch from Jesse Watson on Vimeo.