Categories
Fun

Four Emoji Quizzes

Now practically everyone is in lockdown, everyone seems to be having fun sending around various quizzes. My family have been sharing various emoji quizzes between ourselves, so I decided to make a few myself.

I’ve got quite a bit of spare time, so I actually made the effort to design a proper layout, and look reasonably good.

Each quiz has just 10 emoji phrases, and you’ve got to guess what they represent. The four different topics I chose were:

  • Movies
  • TV Shows
  • UK Landmarks
  • English Football Teams (Based on nicknames)

I’ve got an image for each quiz, and also a version including the answers. I’ll include each of the below, but for the answers you’ll have to click on the relevant answers link.

Movies

Movies Quiz

Questions

Questions and Answers

TV Shows

TV Shows Quiz

Questions

Questions and Answers

UK Landmarks

UK Landmarks Quiz

Questions

Questions and Answers

English Football Teams

English Football Teams Quiz

Questions

Questions and Answers

Categories
General

I’ve Taken My Watch Off

I’ll start by saying, I haven’t worn my Apple Watch in about two weeks. There was no big decision when I stopped wearing it, but I’ve noticed that over the past month or so, I would just be less bothered about wearing it. So much so, the tan line on my wrist has near-enough disappeared.

I know it was about two weeks because that’s when my heart rate data has ended on the Health app. But it occurred regularly before that, where I would wake up and instantly grab my phone and watch. But I would sit down with a coffee, put my phone and my watch both on the side, and never pay any attention to my watch until it was time to put it on charge again.

My original lack of interest with the watch started I think when I wasn’t going to work. Because that’s probably the only time that I felt I needed constant access to everything. Whether it’s the time, the weather, access to music that’s playing from a device just in my pocket, or all the notifications that I would instantly dismiss.

Now when I think about what I can actually gain from the Apple Watch, I’m not sure if I’m ever really going to wear it regularly again.

Here is a list of all the things I’ve ever done with an Apple Watch:

  • Get the time.
  • Pause/Play/Skip music/podcast.
  • Track a workout. (Not a real workout, just small walks)
  • Checked the weather. (Not that it matters to me that much, my outfit doesn’t change all year-round)
  • Tracked my sleep. (It didn’t take long for this to stop)
  • Played a game called Field Day for a while.
  • Triggered a few interactions with Pokémon GO.
  • Checked football scores.

And that’s about all I’ve ever done.

Now for what I use my watch for, just before I started to not wear it as often:

  • Get the time.

I’m starting to think I don’t need a smart watch anymore.

No music/podcasts are being controlled on the watch anymore, because I have AirPods that can do that. I don’t track workouts because they were never real workouts anyway. I don’t play Field Day or Pokémon GO anymore. And if I want to check anything like the weather, football scores, text messages, I just take my phone out of my pocket.

I’ve started to actually like not having my wrist being the interface between myself and the internet. And I’ve grown tired about being notified about things that I just don’t care about.

Maybe I’ll eventually put my watch back on charge and then I can see if there is any remaining use for it. But for now I’ll be keeping it off. Maybe I’ll even think about buying an analogue watch.

Categories
Photography

Spring Photoshoot with Jay

Me and my girlfriend had a but of a small photoshoot with our cat today. He was making all kinds of poses on the sofa, so we instantly got our cameras out. It also gave me an excuse to use my relatively new Fujifilm XT100, with my brand-new Fujinon XC35mm F2 lens.

The light was behind us, which didn’t help, and the blanket on the sofa was pretty reflective. However, I did get a few that I liked. So here are my favourites, which have been slightly adjusted in Lightroom.

20200321 DSCF0135

20200321 DSCF0137

20200321 DSCF0135

20200321 DSCF0153

20200321 DSCF0146

Categories
Linked

Something Funny Called ZoomBombing

Josh Constine, writing about ‘ZoomBombing’ over at TechCrunch:

The world is vulnerable to a new type of trolling as people turn to Zoom video calls to feel connected amidst quarantines. Jerks are using Zoom’s screensharing feature to blast other viewers with the most awful videos from across the internet, from violence to shocking pornography.

That’s just what happened today on the WFH Happy Hour, a popular daily public Zoom call hosted by The Verge reporter Casey Newton and investor Hunter Walk. Suddenly, dozens of attendees were bombarded with disturbing imagery. A troll entered the call and screenshared Two Girls, One Cup and other horrifying sexual videos. Attempts to block the attack were thwarted as the perpetrator simply re-entered the call under a new name and screenshared more gross-out clips. The hosts ended the call rather than subject viewers to the assault until they could stop it.

To be honest, this is a clear example of why you shouldn’t really have communication channels freely open to the public internet, if you don’t want to risk the chance of seeing something you don’t like. However, I probably would have found it pretty funny. But then again, I do enjoy a bit of dark humour.

While I found the situation pretty funny, there was something I would like to point out in the article that I do not agree with:

The problem stems from Zoom’s policy that “The host does not need to grant screen share access for another participant to share their screen.”

Surely that’s not the source of the problem, the “problem” is simply allowing unrestricted access for participants to share any source of video. Who’s to say you couldn’t offend[1] someone via a webcam.


  1. Not that offence actually matters. It exists solely in the offendees head, and that is the only place where it has any effect.  ↩

Categories
General

Pop-Culture Dystopia

Filip Hodas, a 3D illustrator, has created some fantastic pieces of art depicting various dystopian worlds featuring pop-culture icons.

A few of my favourites:

(All photo credit obviously goes to Filip Hodas)

There are 2 parts to this collection:

He also created another great collection titled “Cartoon Fossils“. But that’s not all, I highly recommend following him on Instagram for more of his work.

Categories
Linked

Videos of Cameras in Places

That headline may seem a tad scrambled, but it’s all true. Here is a YouTube channel which features videos of retro cameras, in various different places around the world.

For example, here is a Kodak Six-20 by Lake Garda in Northern Italy:

Categories
Linked

Alphabet and Numbers Icon Pack

Jeff Perry just shared a massive collection of icons designed for use with Shortcuts:

After having the idea of making custom Siri Shortcut icons less than 24 hours ago I am very excited to share with you my Alphabet and Numbers Icon Pack.

[…]

This icon pack is exactly how it sounds, custom icons that go from A-Z and 0-9 in various colors with both white and black backgrounds. There are 10 color options for the white background and 10 color options for the black background. In total there are 720 icons to choose from.

It’s super impressive that this was generated just using Shortcuts, with help from the Toolbox Pro app! I’m downloading these right now, and adding them to the icons I have from the MacStories Pixel collections.

Under the hood the icons that are generated are from SF Symbols, Apple’s massive collection of configurable symbol icons. So I’ll be interested to see if this collection can be expanded upon in the future.

Categories
General

Find the Right Git Command With Git Explorer

If you’ve ever wanted to do something in Git via the command line, but you’re just not quite sure what the command is. Or you roughly know what you want to do, but don’t know where to start, then Git Explorer is the perfect tool.

All you need to do is select from of them 19 options after “I want to”, and that can be something like “I want to compare two commits” or “I want to configure”. Then you get further options to refine the query, and it shows you the exact command you need.

For example, if you wanted to remove multiple branches that matched a certain pattern, then you just need to select these options:

I want to

  • delete/remove
  • multiple branches
  • by pattern

Then you get told the command:

git branch | grep <regex pattern> | xargs git branch -D

And also a helpful note to help you understand it:

e.g. git branch | grep “-” | xargs git branch -D will delete all branches that have ‘-‘ in their names or git branch | grep -v “master|staging” | xargs git branch -D will delete all branches except staging and master.

NB: Always put your regex pattern in quotes

I use Git via the command line myself, but there’s always the odd scenario where I can’t quite figure out the command or proper syntax, so this website will be perfect for me. It’s going straight into my bookmarks.

Check out Git Explorer.

Categories
General

Text Case 2020.1

It’s time for Text Case to receive its first update for 2020. Only a relatively small one this time, but it brings with it two new formats, and some work under the hood that should go unnoticed.

The new formats are quite straight forward:

Straight Quotes. This does the opposite of the “Smart Quotes” format, and converts all curvy quotation marks to the simple straight versions.

Slug. A bit of a weird one if you’re not already aware of what a slug is, but essentially it’s the more human-readable part of a URL that identifies what the page is. For example, a blog post will have a slug usually based on the title of the article. So this format will strip out all non-alphanumeric characters, and separate each word with a hyphen.

This update also contains a few extra things that shouldn’t be noticed, for example the way the UI is managed, and rounding corners, etc. It looks the same, except it’s done in a much more reliable way.

There is another less-than-tiny update to the UI that you may notice, and that is the gradients at the top of each format in the list view. These are now slightly more prominent.

Links


I’m guessing you would have noticed the 2020.1 version number, this is something I’m adopting from now on with all of my apps. The format will simply be YEAR.INCREMENT, where this is the first update to Text Case in 2020.


The updates to Text Case have been quite small and more incremental updates recently, and that I think is down to the maturity of the app. There’s not that many text transformations that people do regularly enough to need it in an app such as Text Case, and there’s only a limited amount of ways you can interact with the app.

So until there’s an advancement in iOS/iPadOS/macOS I can take advantage of, I would expect the updates to continue being small tweaks, and the occasional new format.

In the mean time I should really be working out what app I’m going to be building next!

Categories
Linked

No Longer Essential

The Essential Blog:

In October, we introduced Project GEM, a new mobile experience that our hardware, software and cloud teams have been building and testing for the past few years. Our vision was to invent a mobile computing paradigm that more seamlessly integrated with people’s lifestyle needs. Despite our best efforts, we’ve now taken Gem as far as we can and regrettably have no clear path to deliver it to customers. Given this, we have made the difficult decision to cease operations and shutdown Essential.

I was intrigued when Essential first announced their phone in 2017, enough to write an article about it.

It’s interesting to read what I wrote in that post nearly 3 years ago:

While I don’t think this phone will be for everybody, it’s another competitor, and that can only be a good thing for the industry.

In principle I like the Essential phone, but I just can’t imagine myself switching to Android (this is a deeper problem I’ll expand upon in the future). I would of preferred it to run a separate operating system, but I do respect the amount of work that would take to build, not even thinking about the app ecosystem.

However it is a step in the right direction for Android phones, which I believe was started by the Google Pixel. In my mind, android phones were all about quantity, and not necessarily being the best devices. But it’s started to take a different course, and it’s only for the best.