13th September 2019

In recent years, the expected battery life of new iPhones have always been given in relative values. I saw this as a challenge to try and calculate what the raw number is.

The first place I went to was the technical specifications pages for the three new phones, the 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max. They all had relative values based on the previous generation. Of course, my next step was to look at those values. Again, they were relative.

So I followed the chain until I came to the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus. Their technical specifications no relative or fixed estimates for the battery life. There were estimates for audio playback, video playback, internet usage, etc. But I just wanted a single figure for an estimated use. As that’s what I expect the relative values on recent iPhones to be based on.

As far as I can tell, Apple didn’t talk about the battery life of the 6s generation iPhones when they were first announced. Therefore, I’m going to be basing these on overall estimates that I’ve found online. The numbers I found from various tests were around 8 hours for the 6s, and 10 hours for the 6s Plus.

Using these numbers, I calculated the estimated battery life for the 11 iPhones that were released since.

Here are the numbers (all amounts in hours):

iPhone Relative Values Resolved Values
6s 8
6s Plus 10
7 6s + 2 10
7 Plus 6s Plus + 1 11
8 7 10
8 Plus 7 Plus 11
X 7 + 2 12
XR 8 Plus + 1.5 12.5
XS X + 0.5 12.5
XS Max X + 1.5 13.5
11 XR + 1 13.5
11 Pro XS + 4 16.5
11 Pro Max XS Max + 5 18.5

One thing to point out is that the XR and XS batteries seem to last the same amount of time-based on the 6s/6s Plus estimated values, and then following Apple’s information. It was widely reported that the XR has superior battery life, which makes the numbers seem a bit odd.

But then again, we don’t know what type of data Apple is using for their estimates. Are they going on values that they have for a brand new iPhone when it was announced? Or are they based on the previous generation, but running the most up to date version of iOS? A lot of these things can skew the results.

While I would have preferred if along the chain there was at least one fixed overall value I could have used for a base. However, I do find the data to be interesting. Even if you just look at the relative differences between them. For example, we don’t know the official estimates for the 6s/6s Plus, but we do know that the 11 Pro Max supposedly lasts 8.5 hours longer than the 6s Plus. So a rough 2 hours increase in battery length every year.


Update:

To help visualise the data, here are two charts. The first using only the relative values that Apple provide, and the second including the estimate base values for the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus.

iPhone Battery Life Changes Relative to iPhone 6S and 6S Plus (in Hours)

iPhone Battery Life Using Estimated Base Values for iPhone 6S and 6S Plus (in Hours)

8th September 2019

Just a few weeks ago, my girlfriend and myself took a short trip to Dorset. One of the main parts of the trip was to visit Durdle Door. I was just going through my photos, and I picked out a few of them that I’d like to share here. All photos were taken on my iPhone XS.

https://i0.wp.com/blog.chrishannah.me/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/IMG_0975.jpg?ssl=1

https://i0.wp.com/blog.chrishannah.me/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/IMG_1013.jpg?ssl=1

https://i1.wp.com/blog.chrishannah.me/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/IMG_1004.jpg?ssl=1

https://i1.wp.com/blog.chrishannah.me/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/IMG_0979.jpg?ssl=1

https://i2.wp.com/blog.chrishannah.me/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/IMG_1015.jpg?ssl=1

https://i1.wp.com/blog.chrishannah.me/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/IMG_0989.jpg?ssl=1

https://i0.wp.com/blog.chrishannah.me/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/IMG_0956.jpg?ssl=1

13th August 2019
Permalink

From the Tumblr staff blog:

Hello Tumblr 👋

Today, Tumblr’s owner, Verizon Media, announced that Automattic plans to acquire Tumblr. Automattic is the technology company behind products such as WordPress.com, WooCommerce, Jetpack, and Simplenote—products that help connect creators, businesses, and publishers to communities around the world.

What a great acquisition. It’s clear to see the impressive work that Automattic have been doing over the years, and it will be interesting to see what Tumblr will be like in a few years.

12th August 2019

I came across the idea of having a fixed, 13-month calendar, on Reddit, and it immediately sparked my interest. Each month would have four weeks, and every month would start on a Monday.

Someone then shared a link to the Wikipedia page of something called the “International Fixed Calendar“. Either this is where the Redditor got the idea from, or it’s just a coincidence. Anyway, it sounds good to me!

It means that every single day of the year will always be the same day of the week. Which, in my opinion, makes so much sense.

So every month would look like this:

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Thirteenth Month

The proposed name for the thirteenth month would be “Sol”, and it would be placed between June and July. The name Sol represents the Sun, as it falls on the mid-year solstice.

Recalculation

This would, of course, require all current dates to be recalculated. So your birthday would change, and other events like Easter, that change every year.

Leap Years

You may be thinking “this sounds good, but what about leap years?”. You’ll be pleased to know that the idea of a “Leap Day”, it occurs on the 29th of June. However, it is not classed as being part of any week, and is situated between the Saturday June 28 and Sunday Sol 1.

New Years Day

It’s a similar situation for New Years Day. But as you may already know, this happens every year. New Years Day would be another “bonus” day on the 29th of December. It too is between the last Saturday of the year, and the first Sunday of the proceeding year.

Why Aren’t We Using It?

There’s three main reasons why were aren’t using this calendar right now:

  • It doesn’t easily support quarters. Right now we have three months in a quarter, but in this calendar, it would be three months and one week.
  • Some religions oppose it, as traditions like worshiping on every seventh day, would mess up on a Leap Day or New Years Day.
  • We just aren’t used to it. And therefore a lot of dates would have to be changed, and the systems we have in place would need to adapt.

Converter

There’s no converter online that I can find right now, so hopefully I can find one soon, or maybe I’ll have to make one and upload it myself.

12th August 2019
Permalink

Daniel Oberhaus, writing for Wired:

It was just before midnight on April 11 and everyone at the Israel Aerospace Industries mission control center in Yehud, Israel, had their eyes fixed on two large projector screens. On the left screen was a stream of data being sent back to Earth by Beresheet, its lunar lander, which was about to become the first private spacecraft to land on the moon. The right screen featured a crude animation of Beresheet firing its engines as it prepared for a soft landing in the Sea of Serenity. But only seconds before the scheduled landing, the numbers on the left screen stopped. Mission control had lost contact with the spacecraft, and it crashed into the moon shortly thereafter.

Half a world away, Nova Spivack watched a livestream of Beresheet’s mission control from a conference room in Los Angeles. As the founder of the Arch Mission Foundation, a nonprofit whose goal is to create “a backup of planet Earth,” Spivack had a lot at stake in the Beresheet mission. The spacecraft was carrying the foundation’s first lunar library, a DVD-sized archive containing 30 million pages of information, human DNA samples, and thousands of tardigrades, those microscopic “water bears” that can survive pretty much any environment—including space.

But when the Israelis confirmed Beresheet had been destroyed, Spivack was faced with a distressing question: Did he just smear the toughest animal in the known universe across the surface of the moon?

This is a very interesting story. It’s the first time I’ve heard of the Arch Mission Foundation, and I find it fascinating that people are trying to spread information regarding the human race around the solar system.

What I find most interesting is the fact that they also sent tardigrades. I’ve heard about them before, and how they can survive basically anywhere. So, although they were sent in a dehydrated state, it’s weird to think that there is actually now life on the Moon. It might not be the first time, but it’s the first I’ve heard of such scenario.

11th August 2019

Back in May, I wrote a short list of my wishes for iOS 13. There were only six different things on the list, but seeing as I’ve been using the iOS and iPadOS betas for a while now, I thought I’d revisit it and see how many of them made it.

Dark Mode

This was near-enough guaranteed at the point of me writing my wishes, as we had tons of rumours. But we’ve got it! And it’s everything I expected it to be.

Shortcuts API

I wrote that I wanted apps to have a deeper integration, have the ability to add their own actions into the Shortcuts app, and also support for parameters. We got all of that and more.

Because of the new functionality, I’m adding a much better integration for Text Case. Which means it will be able to provide one single action in Shortcuts, which can accept the text as a parameter, and allow you to select a format from a pre-defined list. It’s a much better solution.

Widgets

I’ll combine two of my aims here. The first being having widgets available on the home screen, and also being able to see more widgets on the iPad.

We didn’t quite get home screen widgets, but at least the iPad can now shrink the app grid and allow for one column of widgets. I would have preferred if you could place these widgets inside the app grid, but I guess it’s a good enough solution.

I also would have preferred if you could see more than one column of widgets on the iPad, especially when you have it in landscape mode, and access them from the lock screen. It just feels like so much wasted space.

Picture-in-Picture on iPhone

I didn’t really expect this to happen, and it didn’t. But I would have liked to be able to have this feature.

Do Not Disturb Improvements

The improvement I wanted to Do Not Disturb was the ability to hide notifications while using a device. This didn’t happen, and I think it’s a sorely missed feature. Whether you’re focussed on work, or wired-in on a movie, getting distracted by a notification is silly.


Overall, I think iOS 13 and iPadOS 13 are impressive updates to a stable foundation in iOS 12.

Splitting the iPadOS away from the main iOS is a good choice in my opinion. Technically this was already happening, as the iPad and iPhone have had slightly different features for quite some time. But this is more of a marketing change, and it signifies that Apple know that they’re truly different devices, and one should not be held back by the other. Hopefully, this means the iPad is freed of the limitations of the iPhone and can advance in even more ways.

There will always be small features that people want, like my desire to have better Do Not Disturb functionality, and Picture-in-Picture on the iPhone. But seeing how many improvements there are in iOS/iPadOS 13, I’m hopeful that they will be addressed to some level in the future.

6th August 2019

Whenever I read about blogging, whether it’s people asking how to get started, tips on how to be better, or just anything in general about writing online, I tend to disagree quite a lot on the feedback that is shared.

I think that, especially when you are starting to write a blog, nearly everything that I see being suggested is detrimental.

Everyone’s telling you to start worrying about SEO, prioritise getting your website linked to from popular websites, working out monetisation, creating a schedule, creating the perfect design, blah, blah, blah.

If you are trying to start a blog, then the best advice is to just start writing, and then press publish. Sure, it might not be the best content you’ll ever produce, but it’s something. Then with the experience of writing and publishing that post, the next one will be slightly better.

Maybe no-one will ever see your first blog post, but that’s not exactly important. The most important thing is that you wrote it. And with it being made available for the world to read, I’m sure you’ll immediately find something you could have done better. So you learn from these mistakes and fix them in the next. These aren’t necessarily mistakes, just a representation of experience, which of course, comes with time.

Just like experience, in time your audience will grow, and if they like your content, they’ll come back. And maybe they’ll even think about sharing it with other people. But the content needs to be there before they can do that, and it needs to provide them with some level of value. But even that isn’t majorly important when you start.

Your aim should be to produce the best content you can. And if people value that content, then even better. If your aim is to make the most money possible or to get high numbers on your analytics, then in my opinion, you’re focussing on the wrong thing.

Maybe I’m too much a fantasist in that I think every blogger should at least be attempting to produce great content. But isn’t that the most logical target? If not, then I think you’re blogging for the wrong reason.

After you’ve built up a body of work, and still regularly providing content, then it wouldn’t hurt to try and get that content to more people. But it’s not the most important thing. And I would argue that it’s especially not important for people that just want to start blogging.

All I’m saying is, if you want to start blogging, then the only thing that matters is getting words out of your head, and published somewhere. You don’t need to worry about the overall theme of your content, your writing style, the name of your blog, getting the perfect domain name, figuring out what tools you want to use, you’ll figure that out once you’ve actually started.

The most important thing is that you actually start.


If after all of this you don’t agree with me, that’s fine. Simply write it all down and publish it to your blog. Then write some more, and some more, and maybe send me a link.

6th August 2019
Permalink

I just watched a fascinating video by the National Geographic. Where Andrew Gray, a Curator of Herpetology at Manchester Museum, spent years researching the Splendid leaf frog, and later discover something truly surprising about the specimens that have already been collected.

There’s a few twists and turns in the story, and to withhold the pleasure of discovering them as you watch, I’ve not disclosed any spoilers.

Watch the video on YouTube.